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to take leading roles in the administration of this under your leadership the best city in america. where did you go? the best city in america. [applause] our district attorney, to you, counsel general, to you, and all of the leadership in the room and thank you for your leadership in making this event such a special one. it takes place in the context of a year when president barack obama recognized the leadership of the community by giving the presidential medal of freedom, the highest award given in the country to dolores for her leadership. [applause] and it was just last week that many of us gathered in the mission to have a at home celebration there and at that time we exchanged complements as to who could say the best things about the community, but the best thing i can say about the community is that your commitment to family values, to education, to the work ethic, to a sense of community, to faith, and to family for all of that, to the courage of many of your ancestors our immediate families to come to america and make the future better for your families with that optism, with
of america's global participation and influence from 1898-1945. in this time the united states introduced numerous political, cultural and economic ideas to the rest of the world. >> good afternoon. thank you for joining us at the heritage foundation. we welcome those who joined us on our heritage.org web site on these occasions. we ask everyone in the house if he would be so kind as to check cellphones one last time and see that they are turned off. amazing how many speakers start doing that. we will post a program on our web site within 24 hours for your future reference and of course our internet viewers are always welcome to e-mail us with questions or comments, simply writing those to speaker@heritage.org. our guest today, dr. juan williams is a native of arizona, a master's degree at arizona state university and received his doctorate from the university of california santa barbara. throughout his high school and college, however, he spent most of his time playing drums in a variety of things. as a rock drummer he was part of several groups one of which opened for steppenwolf among
to understand the war on drugs has never been about drugs. >> americas public enemy number one is a drug abuse. >> what will you do when someone offers you drugs? >> just say no! >> we intend to end the drug menace and to eliminate this dark evil enemy within. >> put him away. >> three strikes and you're out. >> somebody down the road said drugs are bad. there is no argument there. but think about where we are 30 years later. >> i do what i have to do. i know how to survive. i have some way, so -- >> the war against drugs is heating up. >> i think i should have wrote -- they should have written prison guard on my forehead because it's just it's me. >> let him go to prison. >> 20 years for drug trafficking. >> of the 2600 people i sent to federal prison, i see three or four kingpins who are incarcerated. >> people are fed into a machine like me to make sausage. >> law enforcement agencies get rewarded in cash for the sheer numbers of drug arrests. >> that is my money now. >> the scale is unbelievable. >> all sorts of people have a financial interest. >> gun manufacturers, health- care providers
>> and now, bbc world news america. >> this is bbc world news america. aseral patras' steps down the cia director after admitting to an extramarital affair, sending shock waves through washington. and on the political front, it is back to business. can the parties to strike a deal to reverse the looming economic difficulties? a new teen-age magician in town is making quite a market in south africa. welcome to our viewers on public television in america and around the globe. it was a rather unexpected resignation. a short time ago, general david is stepping down as cia director. president obama accepted the resignation of the retired four- star general. he praised his outstanding service. michael, how much of a shock was this? >> it was pretty much a surprise, the general, as far as i know, was very well-thought of at the agency. certainly a defender of the agency and several weeks ago, he made it very clear after the attack that no one at the agency prevented assistance going to the man going under attack. it was the white house -- >> the resignation comes just ahead of hearing a
. fleischman. and by our sole corporate sponsor, mutual of america, designing customized individual and group retirement products. that's why we're your retirement company. >> welcome. it's the weekend after, and barack obama is back in the white house, democrats are back in control of the senate, and republicans are back running the house. that's what prevailed before americans voted, when deadlock reigned in washington, little got done, and the country was frustrated and angry. are we in for more of the same? the talk we are hearing in washington sounds altogether too familiar. so let's consider what's ahead with two people of different philosophies about what should be done. bob herbert was a long-time liberal columnist for "the new york times" until he retired last year and became a distinguished senior fellow for the national think tank demos. he's been on the road for months now, reporting for his forthcoming book, "wounded colossus." reihan salam writes "the agenda," that's a daily blog for the conservative national review online. he is a policy advisor at the think tank economics 21 a
a little too early in the recession and too quick into austerity and california is america's greatest economy, let's not forget that, much bigger than many, many states combined. right now, that's driving america and technology. >> the biggest doesn't necessarily mean greatest, does it, gary b? >> no, it didn't. and jonas is right. we'll have a chance to see how quickly, quote, unquote, california's economy grows, but i want to come back to one other point and jonas made the comment, government can create jobs. government cannot create jobs. first off to hire teachers, that's the biggest kenard out there, that's not the government's job. we would have had millions of net jobs, instead zero net jobs. the government does not create jobs, so that's silly. >> jonas, quickly respond. >> china's created jobs. it's not good jobs, government planning jobs, but if you think the government can't create jobs, look across at the state level. >> and that was-- >> you were right before it's crowding out good private sector jobs. >> exactly. >> you can create jobs at the government level. >> i'm tal
-election, and we know how difficult it was given the fragile economy that we have here in america, but i believe he wants to accomplish two things. one, he wants to generate revenue, ad goo portion of which goes to pay down the debt, and he wants to grow the economy putting america back to work. you know, in california, the governor had 12.5% unemployment. taking office, down to 10.2%, a few more stop looking, so it's 11%, one out of eight california nans not works. you don't have people believing in the american dream if they don't have something to do. i think what the president wants to do is create growth, generate revenues for the people -- neil: i know what he wants to do. sorry, i was not clear. i know what he wants to do, but wondering whether what he proposed today was something that could be flexible? in other words, yes, he wants to raises taxes on the rich. that's going to happen, but maybe the olive branch he's offering back to th branch that boehner offered him is that it needn't be an immediate return to the top rate, but a combination of closing credits, allowances, breaks, that sor
the economy today. he reminded america that there was an election on tuesday and the people have spoken. the president spoke from the east room of the white house surrounded by middle class americans. he's ready to lead on fiscal challenges facing this country. >> the american people voted for action. not politics as usual. you elected us to focus on your jobs, not ours. and in that spirit, i have invited leaders of both parties to the white house next week so we can start to build consensus around the challenges that we can only solve together. >> no heavy hand, no arrogance whatsoever. if there's one word to sum up the president's presentation today, it's this. consistent. the guy who gave the speech is the same guy who we watched on the campaign trail for the last seven months. americans want cooperation when it comes to a deal on the united states economy and the president is delivering his side of the bargain. >> we can't just cut our way to prosperity. if we're serious about reducing the deficit, we have to combine spending cuts with revenue. that means asking the wealthiest ameri
tanks in america. c-span: and where is claremont, california? what's it near? >> guest: well, it's about 30 miles east of la. c-span: in the beginning of your book under acknowledgments, you say, 'through the generosity of henry salvatori, charles kessler brought me to claremont mckenna college as a salvatori visiting scholar.' >> guest: right. c-span: who is henry salvatori? >> guest: salvatori just died recently at the age of--you know, i think he was about 97. he was an italian immigrant who was a very successful businessman and made a pile of money developing techniques of oil exploration that turned out to be very successful. and in his later years, he became a major donor to causes and to people who were interested in restoring the principles of the founding. and he established a center at claremont mckenna college, the salvatori center, which is directed by charles kessler. and they brought me out there knowing that i was somebody who could help advance that work. c-span: where were you when they brought you out there? >> guest: well, i'm based in irving, texas, at the university
that right. we need to get more brond band into rural america. so i think we've got it right for the most part. the challenge has been as we look through those, those have pretty significant financial consequences to some of the companies involved and the idea that was these would be coins dent. that the reform would take place at the same time as vune versele funding and i think we're blind on the universal service funding side. we've got it right on brond band n. large part trying to make money available to carriers to broad band out to consumers who can't get it today but there's much work that needs to be done. and unfortunately it's going to be behind the intercarrier compensation piece. so that's what i would say we have to get right. the f.c.c. is working hard on it and i think we have to be committed to work hard and get this done fast. because one of the fundamental concernses about our members at united states telephone association we do it in a way we maintain the stability of our companies and have you to deal with both these complicated issues at the time. >> this reform is o
san francisco one of the best baseball towns -- no, the best baseball town in america. [cheers and applause] let us now welcome and please show your love and enthusiasm the mayor of city and county of san francisco the honorable edwin lee. former mayor and current lieutenant governor the honorable gavin newsom. the city chief of protocol charlotte schultz, and her husband former secretary of state george schultz. former mayor willie brown. [cheers and applause] and former mayor frank jordan. we want to acknowledge the husband of united states senator and former mayor dianne feinstein, mr. richard bloom. the wife of former mayor gina mos coney and the wife of former mayor joe alliteo, catherine. the sister of former mayor george christopher. the board board and the rest of the city family who has made this event possible. we are also honored to be joined by several giants dignitaries. president and ceo larry baer and his wife sam. [cheers and applause] . giants vice president and general manager brian saibian and his wife amanda. [cheers and applause] the wife of the skip
in his first term. >> america, i believe we can build on the progress we've made and continue to fight for new jobs and new opportunity and new security for the middle class. i believe we can keep the promise of our founders. the idea that if you're willing to work hard, it doesn't matter who you are or where you come from or what you look like or where you love, it doesn't matter whether you're black or white or hispanic or asian ornatetive american or young or old or rich or poor, able, disabled, gay or straight, you can make it here in america if you're willing to try. >> the president's second term will no doubt be fraught with much of the same obstruction and frustration of the past four years, but after tuesday obama will have the opportunity to become one of the most celebrated president's in history. one who may years from now be seen as ushering a new era of liberal governance. he will have that in no small part thanks to his campaign. on wednesday a newly re-elected president obama stopped by to express his gratitude. >> these results, i felt that the work that i had done in
books including america's hidden history: a nation rising, and his 2012 release, "don't know much about the american president." >> host: author kenneth davis, where did the don't know much series of books come from? where did that idea come from?th >> guest: well, the idea for the series came from my own little brain, although it didn't start out as aes series, peter. it really started out with the idea that i loved american history, i wanted to write about it, i wanted to write about it in a way that shared my enthusiasm for a subject i'dwa loved since i was a small title. a small child. the title came of course you and sam song, which i knew from childhood and so it got stuck in my head. and certainly the success of the book, which caught me by surprise more than anyone else perhaps led to the beginning of the series. she outgrew followed and on and on it went from there. so with no pretensions of writing a series of books, i didn't set out to write this book because simply a loved american history. i couldn't understand why we have these surveys that to 17-year-olds don't know their
in our hearts that for the united states of america, the best is yet to come. >> this week, the post-election rubio. -- rubio. >> i still wish i had been able to fulfill your hopes to lead the country in a different direction. >> and where do we go from here? >> mr. president, we stand ready to work with you. >> the republicans take a look at their game plan. >> i think republicans have done a lousy job of reaching out to people of color. >> of good election for women in congress. >> an amazing campaign. let me be clear. i did not bill that. you build that. >> also a look at ballot initiatives, including legalizing pot. >> this is the best day of my life. captioned by the national captioning institute --www.ncicap.org-- >> it was a long, anxious night for a lot of people in this town and across the nation, but then the networks called ohio and you knew it was over. the president won 93% of african-americans, 71% of hispanics, more women than romney. 160% of voters 18 to 29. he won 52% of voters under 34. half the independent voters. 53% of those to make over $50,000 a year. 54% of th
be here that we decided this weekend to also require the americas cup to celebrate -- to require the san francisco giants to have a play off game, the 49ers to play this weekend, the blue grass festival to be here, the parade, as well as the castro sea fair to coincide and welcome you in style. but i wanted to say a few words about the one thing that keeps me up as the head of the legislative body here in san francisco. the reason why i sit with many of our first responders on our city's disaster council, the reason why a few years ago chief white and i led almost a half a billion dollar bond campaign to rebuild the water, fire, and police infrastructure. about every six months i literally wake up in the middle of the night thinking about what would happen if a disaster struck our city. and i think about this and i think i have these nightmares really for three reasons. one, everyone who lives in san francisco knows that in 1906 we were hit not just by an earthquake, but by an earthquake that led to a fire that burned down literally every single neighborhood in the district that i curren
. today he's the ceo of come back america. he's an unapologetic deficit hawk. mohammed al arian is the ceo of pim he could. his firm is the largest investors in bonds. and stephen moore is the founder of the low tax advocacy group club for growth. i'm going to start with you, stephen. my good friend, the fiscal cliff is the immediate threat both parties need to come together to fix it because not fixing it would set even conservative fiscal causes back, don't you agree? >> yeah. i think most republicans agree. they don't want to go off this fiscal cliff either, ali. i think the one hang-up in negotiations which will start on tuesday is the president says, look, i was re-elected to raise those tax rates on the rich. you know what the republicans are saying in the snous you no he what? we were reluctant not to raise the tax rates. i think if the president takes the tax rate increases off the table, you can get an agreement on entitlement reform, getting more revenues and doing some kind of honest to goodness common sense things to get this deficit under control. >> right, and i can grow a he
. he disagrees with raising taxes. >> hi, everybody. on tuesday, america went to the polls. you voted for action. not politics as usual. you elected us to focus on your jobs, not ours. that is why i have invited leaders of both parties to the white house next week so we can build consensus around challenges which can only solve together. i intend to bring in business, labor, and civic leaders from around the country to get their ideas and input. one of economy is still recovering from the great recession, our republic -- our priority has to be jobs and growth. it is a plan to reward businesses who create jobs in america and give people access to education and training those businesses are looking for. it is a plan to keep us on the cutting edge of innovation and clean energy and to reduce our deficits and balance it in a responsible way. this is important because at the end of this year we face a deadline that requires us to make decisions about how to pay down our deficit, decisions that will impact the economy and the middle-class now and in the future. last year, i work with democr
, whom he's let down. >> he's been one of america's greatest military heroes in the last few decades, no question about that. it's an extraordinary ending of one of the great careers. you know him better than many people who will be talking about him today. what do you think would have caused him to behave like this given he's always stood for the complete opposite? >> well, i don't think you can ever know in an affair like this how it came about. in fact, i think one of the key questions now is when and how did the fbi counterintelligence unit find out about this affair and was there any damage done to our security through this affair? and i think it's very important to get to the bottom of that rather quickly. >> if it turns out that the fbi investigation was kept quiet by the white house until after the election, what would be the political ramifications of that? >> well, that would be serious, but i would be surprised if that were the case. i've worked with the fbi for 30 years on various matters, most of them dealing with terrorism, and they are very professional. i would be ver
of an organization, such as ours. general petraeus, one of america's most respected and decorated military leader, served as the agency's head since april of last year. tonight, fox news has learned that the woman petraeus had an affair with is paula broadwell, who wrote a biography on petraeus, called "all in." their relationship was uncovered by the fbi, during an investigation unrelated to this matter. miss broadwell was interviewed on this very program in march. >> i love david petraeus. how well did you get to know him? >> pretty l. i spent 3 years, that started as my dissertation and became a book. i was imbedded into the headquarters and followed him around and gathered strategic information. >> >> pretty amazing. >> the time is garnering a lot of attention. we are only a few short days removed from the presidential election and we are days away from explosive closed-door hearings, related to the benghazi coverup. petraeus was among the group of high-level government officials slated to appear before the house and the senate intelligence committees. but fox news has confirmed, petraeus wil
and south america upside-down. what would happen if we looked at -- there's no reason we can look at it that way. north doesn't have to be a top. we could put south of the top who wanted to. >> host: we will have to leave it there. i apologize. out of time. kenneth davis has been our guest here on "in-depth". . . >> your internet is 20 times faster uploading and 10 times faster downloading. all these other countries understand a fundamental principle. in the 19th century, canals and railroads were the key to economic growth as industrialization came along, and you had to move heavy things like steel. as the 20th century came along, it was highways, the interstate highway program, for example, and airports that were crucial to economic growth. now it's the information superhighway, and what does the industry say? oh, don't call us that anymore. >> best selling author david cay johnston on the many ways corporations try to rob you blind tonight at 10 each on "after words." and tomorrow watch for live coverage of tom wolfe from opening night at miami book fair international this week
you love. no wonder it's america's #1 selling pain reliever. you took action, you took advil®. and we thank you. you took action, you took advil®. why they have a raise your rate cd. tonight our guest, thomas sargent. nobel laureate in economics, and one of the most cited economists in the world. professor sargent, can you tell me what cd rates will be in two years? no. if he can't, no one can. that's why ally has a raise your rate cd. ally bank. your money needs an ally. consider the silverado 1500 -- still the most dependable, longest-lasting full-size pickups on the road. and now we've also been recognized for lowest total cost of ownership -- based on important things, like depreciation, fuel, and maintenance costs. and now when you come in, you can trade up to get a total value of $8,000 on a 2012 chevy silverado all-star edition. from outstanding value to standing the test of time, chevy runs deep. to compete on the global stage. what we need are people prepared for the careers of our new economy. by 2025 we could have 20 million jobs without enough college graduates to fill th
between walter reed and bethesda. america's army is an amazingly heroic army. they have occupied valley forge , tokyo, berlin, danang and now it occupies bethesda, maryland, but we're working through that. how do we break those cultural barriers, how do we figure out supporting supporters, how do we do that before the next capacity goes on? so what have we done, what capabilities do we bring, where do we use them and how will they be playing a role here in the event of the most likely nightmare scenarios for this area? i grew up in the bay area, i have tremendous affection for it. i did train on the east coast but i grew up in santa clara and in napa, i used to come down and watch candlestick park, my dad would bring me down, i would watch the 49ers play and i have great pride in the amount of collaboration and cooperation you are showing to figure out what the next nightmare scenario might be and be ready for it. it's probably going to be either an earthquake, it may be a man-made catastrophe such as an heinous terrorist act that could range anywhere from a mass casualty with chem-b
battleground states. he won the electoral vote. he won the popular vote of -- and he won an america that revealed itself to be more divided than ever. today the president walked into the east room saying elections have consequences. >> what the american people are looking for is corporation. they're looking for consensus. they're looking for common sense. most of all, they want action. i intend to deliver for them in my second term i expect to find willing partners in both parties to make that happen. so let's get to work. gwen: the obama campaign pieced together a electoral puzzle. how did they put it together? >> they had multiple paths to get to 270. they used almost all of them. they were able to through very focused data-driven ground operation identify their voters and successfully reassemble the coalition that they had in 2008. african americans, latino, -- latinos, young voters, women. would young voters turn out in the numbers they did before? in fact, they were by one point a higher percentage than they were in 2008. would african americans vote with the same enthusiasm co
brought down the man in charge of the country's most guarded secrets. >>> becoming lincoln. america's revered president, brought to life by a hollywood dream team. steven spielberg and daniel day lewis ted diane sawyer about separating the man from the myth. >>> and walk on the wild side. up close and personal with a rare and fearsome predator. our reporter puts tail in hand to get to know the african white lion. >> announcer: from the global resources of abc news, with terry moran, cynthia mcfadden and bill weir in new york city, this is "nightline," november 9th, 2012. >> good evening, i'm bill weir. when president obama strode into the east room of the white house this afternoon, we all knew that job one of term two is to hammer out some sort of deal with republicans to keep the federal government from veering off the so-called fiscal cliff. and we knew he would probably lay down some markers. >> i'm open to compromise. i'm open to new ideas. i'm committed to solving our fiscal challenges. but i refuse to accept any approach that isn't balanced. i'm not going to ask students and
to madmoney.cnbc.com. in america today we're running to compete on the global stage. what we need are people prepared for the careers of our new economy. by 2025, we could have 20 million jobs without enough college graduates to fill them. that's why at devry university, we're teaming up with companies like cisco to help make sure everyone's ready with the know how we need for a new tomorrow. [ male announcer ] make sure america's ready. make sure you're ready. at devry.edu/knowhow. ♪ >> you've got the u.s. marines in afghanistan. >> in honor of my grandfather. >> in honor of my great grandfather. >> thank you to the veterans today and the ones that came before us to help make our nation free. [ applause ] >> welcome back to our special salute to the troops show. we're proud to have so many brave men and women. i will gladly admit that there are some things the government does really well with national defense at the top of the list. but when you find yourself in a situation where we are at now, that's a problem. i'm a stock guy. i hate to pontificate about politics. it's supposed to be pr
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 239 (some duplicates have been removed)